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MS Casanova

Peter Deilmann Cruises - Page 2
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ABOVE: Casanova's lounge has floor-to-ceiling windows that face directly onto the water..

MS Casanova: the ship

Casanova was built in 2001 for cruises on Italy's Po River, where ships must be able to cruise under low bridges and fit comfortably in narrow, shallow canals. As a result, it's smaller than many ships that cruise Central European waters, with a length of 338 feet and a beam of 32 feet, or 103 m by 9,70 m. The ship could be described as a "boutique vessel," since it accommodates only 96 passengers.

Most public rooms are on the Verdi deck, or main deck, which also has 26 of the the ship's 48 passenger cabins. A staircase leads down to the Rialto Deck, where a foyer separates the restaurant from the 22 lower-deck staterooms. The Sundeck, an open area on the top of the ship, offers deck chairs, tables, and plenty of space along the railings for sightseeing and picture-taking.

Passengers enter and leave the ship via the reception area, located amidships on the Verdi deck, which acts as a buffer between the public rooms and cabins. A doorway on the starboard side of Casanova leads past a boutique/hairdresser into the large and well-appointed lounge, which has a bar, a library corner, a small dance floor, and a piano for entertainment.

Next page: Audience and ambience


MS Casanova Cruise Review
Introduction Service
MS Casanova: the ship Shore excursions
Audience and ambience Overall rating
Staterooms Web links
Dining  

Also see:
Casanova photos: 41 captioned pictures of the ship

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