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Norwegian Jade Cruise Photos

From: Norwegian Jade Cruise Review

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Day 9: Livorno (2)

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We headed out of downtown, passing the monument of the Quattro Mori (Four Moors).

Contrary to what you might guess, the figures in chains don't represent slavery; They symbolize the victory of the Grand Dukes of Tuscany over pirates who roamed the Mediterranean in the 16th Century.


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On the outskirts of downtown, just beyond the Quattro Mori monument, we reached Livorno's Fortezza Vecchia or Old Fort.

According to a sign nearby, the Old Fort is "the symbol of Medicean Livorno." It was built between 1521 and 1534 and included a palace for Cosimo, the first Grand Dukes of Tuscany. Later, in the 19th Century, the fortezza became a jail for criminals and political prisoners.


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From this angle, you can see how close the port is to the city center. (Unfortunately, you can't walk to or from your ship.)


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We were intrigued by the pedestrian bridge leading to the Fortezza Vecchia. (The fort was closed during our Sunday visit, and a portion of the bridge deck was retracted to let boats enter the yacht harbor from Livorno's canals.)


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We followed the canal to the Quartiere Venezia or Venice Quarter.


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The quarter was a pleasant area of the city with boat moorings and apartment houses overlooking the water.


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It did look a bit like Venice, except for the parked cars along the quays.


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The district's canals were livelier than the streets above, with pleasure boats cruising through the canals on their way to the Porto Mediceo and the sea. 


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Canalside bars offered refreshment to Italians and visiting Englishmen.


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Another tavern's sign paid homage to Historic Route 66 in the American Southwest.


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We continued walking until we reached Livorno's other name-brand ruin, the Fortezza Nuova or New Fort, which dates to the turn of the 17th Century.


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Inside the fortress entrance, there wasn't much to see except for the heavy brick walls that had survived bombardment by the Allies in World War II.


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We had mental images of Enid Blyton's The Famous Five adventure novels as we followed a tunnel into the castle depths.


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The tunnel led to a public park on the ramparts of the fortress.

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From the ramparts, we could look out on the Piazza della Repubblica, which was on the other side of a canal and moat that surrounded the fortezza.


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A young woman exercised her dog in the park, and an older couple exercised their Second Amendment rghts.


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On the way out of the Fortezza Nuova, we encountered thick walls, a cat, and a couple with a thirsty dog.


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A footbridge led us into Livorno's largest square, the Piazza della Repubblica., which was dominated by a statue of Ferdinando III (the Grand Duke of Tuscany two centuries ago).


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Following Ferdinand's example, we took pictures of ourselves to honor our modest contribution to the history of Tuscany. (Snapshots are cheaper than statues.)

We then tried to follow a canal around the eastern border of the town center, and that fruitless attempt led to our next series of photos, which we've titled "Lost in Livorno."


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Norwegian Jade cruise photos:
Introduction to Photo Diary
Day 1: Departure from Venice
Day 2: At Sea
Day 3: At Sea
Day 4: Santorini
Day 5: Kuşadasi
Day 6: Piraeus
Day 7: At Sea
Day 8: Civitavecchia
Day 9: Livorno
Day 10: Cannes
Day 11: At Sea
Day 12: Valletta
Day 13: Messina
Day 14: At Sea
Day 15: Arrival in Venice

Also see:
Norwegian Jade Cruise Review
Venice for Cruisers