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Shopping Hours
in Switzerland & Austria

Switzerland Austria Swiss Austrian shopping hours Bern outdoor market fruit

ABOVE: Bicyclists shop for fruit at an outdoor market in Bern, Switzerland. (Hours of street markets vary. Some are open daily, while others may be open just once or twice a week.)

Europeans aren't likely to be fazed by Swiss and Austrian shopping hours, but tourists from the U.S. and Canada may be surprised to learn that 9 a.m.-to-11 p.m. discount stores and 24-hour supermarkets haven't yet invaded Alpine and Central Europe.

Laws have become more liberal in recent years, especially for shops in tourist areas. The opening hours in this article are typical of what you'll find in larger cities, towns, and resorts. In small villages off the beaten track, hours may be more limited and shopkeepers may close up for lunch.

Swiss shopping hours

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday 9 a.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Shops in smaller towns and villages may close on Monday (either morning or all day).
Thursday 9 a.m. - 8 or 9 p.m. (mainly in larger cities and towns)
Saturday 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Sunday and holidays Closed (except for bakeries, which may be open in the morning)

NOTES:

  • In cities, railroads stations usually have shops where you can buy reading material, food, and other essentials between 6 a.m. and 10 p.m.
  • Barber shops and beauty parlors are normally closed on Mondays, and many pharmacies (chemists) are closed on Tuesdays.
  • In larger cities and towns, you'll often find 24-hour automats at railroad stations and bakeries.
  • Regional shopping malls typically stay open later than independent shops do. For example, the Mythen Center in Schywz is open until 8 p.m. most weekdays and until 9 p.m. on Fridays.

Shopping in Austria

Next Page > Austrian shopping hours > Page 1, 2


Swiss shopping hours Austrian shopping hours

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